‘World’s richest Islamic arts collection’ a sight not to be missed

Stella McDaniel

The Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts in Istanbul presents guests a opportunity to get rid of them selves in the specifics of hand-lettered and illustrated copies of the Quran, handwoven carpets, and a lot of other beautiful artefacts from Islamic civilisations.

The Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts is found in the Ibrahim Pasha Palace in the Sultanahmet district of Istanbul. Recognized in 1914 as the Islamic Foundations Museum in the general public kitchen area making inside the Suleymaniye Mosque Complex, it costs alone as a locale wherever you can look at artefacts “from the Umayyad Dynasty to the Ottoman Empire: 13 centuries of splendour.”

A handmade album from the Timurid period, produced in Shiraz, dated 801/1398, by calligrapher Mansur bin Muhammed bin Baraka bin Omar bin Bahtiyar of Behbahan.
(Selin Alemdar / TRTWorld)

Just one of the primary factors that the museum was set up was to prevent the reduction and theft of products of historical and religious worth from mosques, religious schools, zawias and shrines in the course of the Ottoman Empire.

A griffin (mythical creature that’s a composite of a lion with an eagle) from the Anatolian Seljuk period, 13th century.
A griffin (legendary creature that’s a composite of a lion with an eagle) from the Anatolian Seljuk time period, 13th century.
(Selin Alemdar / TRTWorld)

The museum’s title was modified to the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts in 1924 (immediately after the emergence of the Republic of Türkiye), and the museum moved to the next courtyard of Ibrahim Pasha Palace in 1983. It was the past museum established all through the reign of the Ottoman Empire.

Zubdet’ut Tevarih (religious, Islam and Ottoman history), prepared for Sultan Murad III. Dated 993/1583. The open pages show a djinn with two fish in his hands, and the opposite page depicts Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden.
Zubdet’ut Tevarih (religious, Islam and Ottoman record), geared up for Sultan Murad III. Dated 993/1583. The open up pages present a djinn with two fish in his arms, and the opposite webpage depicts Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden.
(Selin Alemdar / TRTWorld)

The Ibrahim Pasha Palace was built on the ruins of the Hippodrome in Sultanahmet. The Hippodrome is rumoured to have been built next the changeover of Byzantion to the Romans by emperor Septimus Severus. The building, it is claimed, was completed by Constantinus I in 330.

The tombstone for Serife Hanim and her son Hikmet Molla, a pregnant woman who died, from the 19th century originating from Edirnekapi Cemetery.
The tombstone for Serife Hanim and her son Hikmet Molla, a expecting girl who died, from the 19th century originating from Edirnekapi Cemetery.
(Selin Alemdar / TRTWorld)

Some of the historical construction of the Hippodrome is visible inside the museum. The Hippodrome was utilised as a public accumulating put in the course of the Ottoman Empire, bearing witness to the 15-day marriage festivities of Ibrahim Pasha and Hatice Sultan in 1524, the circumcision ceremonies of Suleiman the Magnificent’s 3 sons in 1530, the 57-working day extended circumcision ceremony of Murad III’s son Mehmed, to give a couple of examples.

Accoutrements for women’s hammam sessions. While men had coffee houses, women socialised in hammams, public Turkish baths that were especially popular during the Ottoman era.
Accoutrements for women’s hammam sessions. Whilst adult men had espresso houses, females socialised in hammams, community Turkish baths that ended up primarily well-liked during the Ottoman period.
(Selin Alemdar / TRTWorld)

The identify Atmeydani (“Horse Square” in English) indicates that through the Ottoman reign, races ended up held there, as nicely as javelin game titles and horse markets. The square at some point misplaced its character of currently being the location of ceremonies and festivities.

An amazing silk carpet that gives a general view of Istanbul in the 19th century, from the Ottoman period.
An wonderful silk carpet that provides a common perspective of Istanbul in the 19th century, from the Ottoman period.
(Selin Alemdar / TRTWorld)

What is on show?

The museum showcases the rich historical past of Islamic artefacts heading again as much as the four caliphates. It has stunning carved doorways, lovely sculptures and reliefs of animals, relics from the Prophet Muhammad, meticulously hand-woven carpets of wool and silk dating back again to the 13th century, and the very first Turkish translated edition of the Quran with Karakhanid Turkish text in Arabic script in pink ink beneath the black Arabic original.

One of the double lion sculptures guarding Konya Aleaddin Kiosk that dates back to the Anatolian Seljuk period, 13th century.
One of the double lion sculptures guarding Konya Aleaddin Kiosk that dates back again to the Anatolian Seljuk interval, 13th century.
(Selin Alemdar / TRTWorld)

What is a lot more, there is a area dedicated to reimagining life in Istanbul in the 19th century, as well as non permanent exhibitions. The recent momentary exhibition, jogging until eventually late August, is termed Dar al-Mulk Konya Seljuk Palaces, and is properly well worth viewing in addition to the lasting collection.

A splendid wooden door by the Karamanids who lived in Anatolia is crafted decoratively, with the script above reading “Our door is open to who enters through, our food is legitimate for who eats it.”
A splendid wood doorway by the Karamanids who lived in Anatolia is crafted decoratively, with the script higher than studying “Our door is open up to who enters by way of, our food stuff is respectable for who eats it.”
(Selin Alemdar / TRTWorld)

The Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts is open up every day from 9 am to 6 pm in the summer period. In the winter period, it is shut on Mondays and open up from 9 am to 4 pm Tuesdays by Sundays.

It is positioned in the Sultanahmet district of Istanbul, at Binbirdirek Mahallesi, Atmeydani Sokak No: 12. The entrance price is 100 TL (less than $6) for grown ups concessions for learners and Muzekart holders offered. 

THUMBNAIL Image: A candle hanger from the Memluk period courting back again to the 15th century. (Selin Alemdar/TRT Earth)

HEADLINE Image: A Kaaba belt, painstakingly embroidered by Ottoman Empire artisans with silver and golden threads, is a lovely artefact relationship again to the 19th century. (Selin Alemdar/TRT Environment)

Source: TRT Globe

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